ONLINE TESOL Course – TESOL Foundation

Language teaching as a profession involves challenges, growth, joy and fulfillment to teachers who enjoy their job. The joy of teaching language lies in the pleasure of seeing students grow in linguistic proficiency, and in successfully meeting their communication needs and interests.

Some familiar terms that are in play in the world of language teaching includes “ESL” (English as a second language) and “ESOL” (English for speakers of other languages) – most commonly used in relation to teaching and learning English. “TESL” (teaching English as a second language), “TEFL” (teaching English as a foreign language) and “TESOL” (Teaching English to speakers of other languages) are also used in the same context of teaching-learning.

TESOL is an acronym that stands for Teaching English to speakers of other languages.
Within the purview of TESOL comes the teaching of English as a second language as well as a foreign language.

ESOL (English for speakers of other languages) the integral component of TESOL, is extensively used worldwide, especially in the United States.

The terms ESL (English as a second language) and EFL (English as a foreign language) play significant roles in teaching and learning of English language worldwide. Despite sharing the same origin, EFL and ESL differ on the basis of context. This variance in context requires different materials, syllabi and pedagogy.

The term ESL is used to refer to situations in which English is being taught and learned in countries, contexts and cultures in which English is the predominant language of communication. The concept of teaching English to immigrants in countries such as Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States typify ESL. In these countries, individuals from non-English-speaking backgrounds may speak their LI at home, but will be required to use English for communicating at work, in school and in the community in general. The term is also prevalent in countries where English is widely used as, lingua franca. These include the Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong (where its usage reflects the Region’s recent past as a colony of the United Kingdom); Singapore (a multilingual society with English as a lingua franca) and India (where the populations speak a range of other languages and where English as well as Hindi enables communication between these diverse linguistic groups).

EFL is used in contexts where English is neither widely used for communication, nor used as the medium of instruction. Brazil. Japan. Korea. Thailand and Mexico are countries where English is taught as a foreign language, either as part of the elementary and high-school curriculum, or in private schools and other educational settings. In most EFL settings there is limited exposure to the language outside of the classroom, and often limited opportunity to use it. The syllabus therefore needs to be carefully structured with extensive recycling of key target-language items. In addition the burden for providing the cultural dimension to the curriculum very much rests with the teacher. Teaching is also complicated by the fact that teachers are usually non-native speakers of English who may lack opportunities to use the language, or lack confidence in using it. In such situations it is important for the materials to provide the sort of rich and diverse linguistic input that ESL learners encounter in the world beyond the classroom.

With globalization and the rapid expansion of information technologies, there has been an explosion in the demand for English worldwide. This has led to greater diversification in the contexts and situations in which it is learned and used, as well as in the nature of the language itself. English no longer belongs to the United Kingdom, or to the United States. It is an increasingly diverse and diversified resource for global communication.

There are many teaching aspects to look at before the actual teaching that will make you well prepared, such as, a solid awareness of language. There are also ideas and methods to learn that will help make you a good teacher. A comprehensive teacher training course driven with a well defined approach has the potential to lead a teacher to this joy of teaching. A proper program, such as TESOL, will equip you with the skills, knowledge and methods to produce your own successful classes.

In order to develop into a successful TESOL professional you will want to develop your own teaching style. You may feel that the real training starts inside the classroom and in front of your students. But this TESOL program endeavors to help you emerge ready, prepared and confident before making your way into the classroom. This TESOL program takes a principled approach towards language teaching. But no amount of theory can prepare you for what you are going to face when you are standing in front of your students. Therefore, in a TESOL program, you are asked to do tasks based on the things that work most of the time (with most classes and most teachers). Moves here are based upon principles of language learning and teaching found in most “communicative language learning” classrooms.

Our endeavor on the TESOL course is to make you go through that experience before you take up a teaching assignment; to help you to be ready, prepared and confident before you step into the classroom.

This course involves behaviors and choreographies that can be employed in classrooms to facilitate learning. Learned behavior for effective teaching when linked with your planned lesson frameworks, will form the choreographies to facilitate your students’ learning. To be precise, this TESOL program blends proven techniques with the ability to provide interplay between the students, teacher and texts that constitute real teaching and learning situations. The goal of our program is to get you into the classroom with these “moves”. Then the rest is up to you to use them at your disposal to build a successful personal teaching style that will bring you a memorable lifelong learning experience, and joy in your new chosen profession.

What about methodology, techniques and approaches to language learning? It is evident that talking about language and grammar rules is not a sufficient or even necessary condition for learning language. Equally, talking language teaching ideas and methods seems an unlikely condition for learning to teach. Put another way, good teachers know what to do. It is not necessarily true that they know why they do certain things, or what makes them effective. TESOL will present “what to do” based upon things that work most of the time with most classes for most teachers. These “moves” are based upon principles of language learning and teaching that are found in “communicative language learning” classrooms.

The Online TESOL Certificate Program will present the behaviors and choreographies that can be employed in a classroom to facilitate learning. It provides the behaviors for effective teaching, and when linked together in lesson frameworks, forms the choreographies to facilitate learning. The comparison to dancing is more than an acute metaphor. Like dancing, teaching requires that you learn some body movements and choreographies that are not natural for most. Learning these behaviors and choreographies requires the same neural-motor skills as dancing. The only thing missing is the “music” and that is provided by the interplay between students, teacher and text that constitutes the real teaching learning situation. While anyone can learn to perform the steps, dancing to the music may take some time and experience in classrooms with real students. The goal of TESOL is to get you into the classroom with the “moves” you need to work with. The rest is up to you and a lifelong learning experience called teaching.

Language teaching as a profession involves challenges, growth, joy and fulfillment to teachers who enjoy their job. The joy of teaching language lies in the pleasure of seeing students grow in linguistic proficiency, and in successfully meeting their communication needs and interests.

Some familiar terms that are in play in the world of language teaching includes “ESL” (English as a second language) and “ESOL” (English for speakers of other languages) – most commonly used in relation to teaching and learning English. “TESL” (teaching English as a second language), “TEFL” (teaching English as a foreign language) and “TESOL” (Teaching English to speakers of other languages) are also used in the same context of teaching-learning.

TESOL is an acronym that stands for Teaching English to speakers of other languages.
Within the purview of TESOL comes the teaching of English as a second language as well as a foreign language.

ESOL (English for speakers of other languages) the integral component of TESOL, is extensively used worldwide, especially in the United States.

The terms ESL (English as a second language) and EFL (English as a foreign language) play significant roles in teaching and learning of English language worldwide. Despite sharing the same origin, EFL and ESL differ on the basis of context. This variance in context requires different materials, syllabi and pedagogy.

The term ESL is used to refer to situations in which English is being taught and learned in countries, contexts and cultures in which English is the predominant language of communication. The concept of teaching English to immigrants in countries such as Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States typify ESL. In these countries, individuals from non-English-speaking backgrounds may speak their LI at home, but will be required to use English for communicating at work, in school and in the community in general. The term is also prevalent in countries where English is widely used as, lingua franca. These include the Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong (where its usage reflects the Region’s recent past as a colony of the United Kingdom); Singapore (a multilingual society with English as a lingua franca) and India (where the populations speak a range of other languages and where English as well as Hindi enables communication between these diverse linguistic groups).

EFL is used in contexts where English is neither widely used for communication, nor used as the medium of instruction. Brazil. Japan. Korea. Thailand and Mexico are countries where English is taught as a foreign language, either as part of the elementary and high-school curriculum, or in private schools and other educational settings. In most EFL settings there is limited exposure to the language outside of the classroom, and often limited opportunity to use it. The syllabus therefore needs to be carefully structured with extensive recycling of key target-language items. In addition the burden for providing the cultural dimension to the curriculum very much rests with the teacher. Teaching is also complicated by the fact that teachers are usually non-native speakers of English who may lack opportunities to use the language, or lack confidence in using it. In such situations it is important for the materials to provide the sort of rich and diverse linguistic input that ESL learners encounter in the world beyond the classroom.

With globalization and the rapid expansion of information technologies, there has been an explosion in the demand for English worldwide. This has led to greater diversification in the contexts and situations in which it is learned and used, as well as in the nature of the language itself. English no longer belongs to the United Kingdom, or to the United States. It is an increasingly diverse and diversified resource for global communication.

There are many teaching aspects to look at before the actual teaching that will make you well prepared, such as, a solid awareness of language. There are also ideas and methods to learn that will help make you a good teacher. A comprehensive teacher training course driven with a well defined approach has the potential to lead a teacher to this joy of teaching. A proper program, such as TESOL, will equip you with the skills, knowledge and methods to produce your own successful classes.

In order to develop into a successful TESOL professional you will want to develop your own teaching style. You may feel that the real training starts inside the classroom and in front of your students. But this TESOL program endeavors to help you emerge ready, prepared and confident before making your way into the classroom. This TESOL program takes a principled approach towards language teaching. But no amount of theory can prepare you for what you are going to face when you are standing in front of your students. Therefore, in a TESOL program, you are asked to do tasks based on the things that work most of the time (with most classes and most teachers). Moves here are based upon principles of language learning and teaching found in most “communicative language learning” classrooms.

Our endeavor on the TESOL course is to make you go through that experience before you take up a teaching assignment; to help you to be ready, prepared and confident before you step into the classroom.

This course involves behaviors and choreographies that can be employed in classrooms to facilitate learning. Learned behavior for effective teaching when linked with your planned lesson frameworks, will form the choreographies to facilitate your students’ learning. To be precise, this TESOL program blends proven techniques with the ability to provide interplay between the students, teacher and texts that constitute real teaching and learning situations. The goal of our program is to get you into the classroom with these “moves”. Then the rest is up to you to use them at your disposal to build a successful personal teaching style that will bring you a memorable lifelong learning experience, and joy in your new chosen profession.

What about methodology, techniques and approaches to language learning? It is evident that talking about language and grammar rules is not a sufficient or even necessary condition for learning language. Equally, talking language teaching ideas and methods seems an unlikely condition for learning to teach. Put another way, good teachers know what to do. It is not necessarily true that they know why they do certain things, or what makes them effective. TESOL will present “what to do” based upon things that work most of the time with most classes for most teachers. These “moves” are based upon principles of language learning and teaching that are found in “communicative language learning” classrooms.

The Online TESOL Certificate Program will present the behaviors and choreographies that can be employed in a classroom to facilitate learning. It provides the behaviors for effective teaching, and when linked together in lesson frameworks, forms the choreographies to facilitate learning. The comparison to dancing is more than an acute metaphor. Like dancing, teaching requires that you learn some body movements and choreographies that are not natural for most. Learning these behaviors and choreographies requires the same neural-motor skills as dancing. The only thing missing is the “music” and that is provided by the interplay between students, teacher and text that constitutes the real teaching learning situation. While anyone can learn to perform the steps, dancing to the music may take some time and experience in classrooms with real students. The goal of TESOL is to get you into the classroom with the “moves” you need to work with. The rest is up to you and a lifelong learning experience called teaching.

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